Sorry your browser is not supported!

You are using an outdated browser that does not support modern web technologies, in order to use this site please update to a new browser.

Browsers supported include Chrome, FireFox, Safari, Opera, Internet Explorer 10+ or Microsoft Edge.

Geek Culture / Anyone heard of Tech Elevator?

Author
Message
Phaelax
DBPro Master
16
Years of Service
User Offline
Joined: 16th Apr 2003
Location: Metropia
Posted: 10th Mar 2019 17:36
I don't expect anyone outside the midwest part of the US to have heard of it but thought I'd ask anyway. More or less it's a programming bootcamp, kind of like one of those myComputerCareer.com things. I spoke with them and they claim to have a 97% job placement after completion. I ran into one of their part-time instructors who happened to be a buddy of mine I used to do a veteran charity with and he thinks it's the real deal. Another friend told me they've hire folks out of the program as well. You choose either Java or .NET. After interviewing with them, they accepted me into the program if I so choose to go. The drawback is, it's a 14wk course and you can't really hold a job while doing it. Plus, it costs a whopping $15k! Despite my degree (which covered java programming) and my brief stint as a JSP developer, I've mostly been stuck in help desk roles and the last 4 years in a non-IT field. Anyone who's tried to get into IT after being out of the field knows most folks think you're no longer relevant. So I'm more or less banking on the name of this company to help get the job moreso than the actual skill set. Not to say I wouldn't learn anything in it, I'm sure I definitely would, but the price is a concern if their job placement doesn't turn out like they claim.
Tiled TMX Importer V.2
XML Parser V.2
Base64 Encoder/Decoder
Purple Token - Free online hi-score database
Legend of Zelda

"I like offending people, because I think people who get offended should be offended." - Linus Torvalds
Zotoaster
14
Years of Service
User Offline
Joined: 20th Dec 2004
Location: Scotland
Posted: 16th Mar 2019 13:22 Edited at: 16th Mar 2019 13:24
I hear you. I've been living on a Greek island for the last 5 years where "tech job" has little meaning. Aside from working in bars and yachts I've been working mostly freelance getting whatever clients I can get on my own, making websites/web apps or doing some digital marketing.

I've been back in Scotland for almost 4 months now and after countless interviews I still haven't landed a job, and of course I can't afford one of those ludicrously expensive bootcamps. I've been working through freeCodeCamp.org which focuses on web development with javascript (front end and back end), and as the name suggests it's free. It's supposed to be quite reputable and has tests and certificates they offer which you can then put on your CV/resume.

Maybe there's an equivalent for .NET or Java.

I would also suggest adding to your portfolio with your own projects, even if they're just proofs of concept. Word of warning though, from my recent experience everybody wants knowledge of frameworks. I've rarely been asked about algorithms, data structures, design principles, or anything that makes a good programmer good. They all want framework knowledge presumably because frameworks protect programmers from making common mistakes. This is quite annoying because my CV includes a decent list of published apps, a working programming language which I used to make a lot of apps, usage of cool APIs like Stripe, knowledge of lots of programming languages, you name it. But nope, as impressed as they are, I need to know more about React or Laravel or whatever the hot new thing is.

So I would say find out what the swankiest frameworks are for Java/.NET and use them to create and publish a simple application and stick it in your resume, and if you can, find an equivalent to freeCodeCamp.org. If that doesn't work then good luck collecting $15k and having 14 weeks free! Ha!


\"everyone forgets a semi-colon sometimes.\" - Phaelax
Phaelax
DBPro Master
16
Years of Service
User Offline
Joined: 16th Apr 2003
Location: Metropia
Posted: 17th Mar 2019 05:57
Since the past few years I've been out of the field, my Security+ expired a few weeks ago which I only got in the first place as a contingency for a government job. Last couple of days I started digging into Java again, it's been several years since I've really done anything. I used Vectors in a lot of my old code, which apparently has been deprecated in newer versions of java. Also lots of new features added I have to familiarize myself with. Granted that class would cover all this I'm sure, but I like to stay ahead. I have bits and pieces of an iTunes clone I started over 10 years ago, lost most of the code from a harddrive failure. So remaking it has been my new self-study project.
Tiled TMX Importer V.2
XML Parser V.2
Base64 Encoder/Decoder
Purple Token - Free online hi-score database
Legend of Zelda

"I like offending people, because I think people who get offended should be offended." - Linus Torvalds
Zotoaster
14
Years of Service
User Offline
Joined: 20th Dec 2004
Location: Scotland
Posted: 17th Mar 2019 14:56
One of my struggles these is finding a balance between what's popular these days and likely to get me a job; what's niche and might find me a well-paying job but also might not get me one at all; and things that interest me. A hard balance to strike for sure!

With regards to Java, it's main applications these days seem to be server-side programming and Android apps. I haven't been seeing many vacancies for desktop application development in Java these days (that being said, I haven't seen many vacancies for desktop application development in general, so there's that).

In any case if you're looking for Java work it might be worth making some APIs or an Android app to put in your portfolio. I see in your signature you've already made your Purple Token API. I don't know what you made it with but if you haven't made it with Java it might be a fun to do so; would definitely get you up to speed with some of the more useful aspects of server-side Java, such as creating routes, responding to requests, talking to a database, security, etc.

Damn you could even make an Android game with Java that then talks to your Java API. Then you've got front-end and back-end Java with a topic that you're familiar with (games) but also gives you an opportunity to learn the meat n' potatoes of what makes Java a desirable language these days.


\"everyone forgets a semi-colon sometimes.\" - Phaelax

Login to post a reply

Server time is: 2019-05-22 17:54:04
Your offset time is: 2019-05-22 17:54:04