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3 Dimensional Chat / milkshape

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koolaid
21
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Joined: 26th Jan 2003
Location: Cyberspace
Posted: 17th Feb 2003 11:48
i just got a trial of milkshape 3d im sort of new to 3d modeling is every model made up of primitives just configured to your needs
actarus
21
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Joined: 29th Aug 2002
Location: 32 Light Years away
Posted: 17th Feb 2003 14:50
Every modeler makes them differently...I suggest using the Vertex and Face tools to create your own...It's a bit slower but much more precise as you will place every face one at the time.

Get one or two good reference pictures such as 'Simple's proportions drawings and apply them to their respective viewports...The front and side(usually).

Then use the 'vertex' tool to create the points(3) that will define the first triangle...Make sure they conform to the reference picture you have,usually I start with the belly-area but really it's up to you and when your first three vertice are done and positionned,use the 'face' tool to make the face,just choose a viewport and click CCW on the vertice after the last one,a triangle should now be visible....Do the same for the rest.

If you need more explanations,just ask.

Just remember that you're standing on a planet that's evolving
And revolving at nine hundred miles an hour!
John H
Retired Moderator
21
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Joined: 14th Oct 2002
Location: Burlington, VT
Posted: 17th Feb 2003 17:30
For humans (especially simples) you can really use cylinders for a lot of the model, but vertices are always the best way to go

RPGamer

Current - RPG: Eternal Destiny
http://www.halbrosproductions.netfirms.com
Dont ask those questions! Read the help files lazy!
Shadow Robert
21
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Joined: 22nd Sep 2002
Location: Hertfordshire, England
Posted: 18th Feb 2003 02:09
i personally wouldn't stick to any singluar style of development ... some people use simple geometric modeling, some use vertex-face modeling, some use extrustion and flip modeling ... there are so many forms out there.

but if you want to actually work freely around whatever you develop it is best to learn and understand as many possible techiques as you can find for the program you use.
because each situation warrents it own use of modelling style.

you can then work on the one most that suits you, it also means you don't become a simple copycat modeler - allows you more freedom to think about howto develop this is infinately more useful ... beware of tutorials which explain to you exactly step-by-step ... a learning process should be just that, and if youre simply copying what is infront of you your mnemonically learning - benifits no one to learn this way

play with the program a while and just checkout what you can do before starting anything worthwhile (^_^)

Tsu'va Oni Ni Jyuuko Fiori Sei Tau!
One block follows the suit ... the whole suit of blocks is the path ... what have you found?
koolaid
21
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Joined: 26th Jan 2003
Location: Cyberspace
Posted: 19th Feb 2003 09:34
thanks raven for the advice
Gu re gu
21
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Joined: 14th Dec 2002
Location: United Kingdom
Posted: 19th Feb 2003 10:56
I've got milkshape and i use it almost exclusively. I don't texture my models in it though. Thats because i don't know how to get the texture coordinate editor to work. It's just a grey window with a couple of buttons down the side. Does any1 use this feature because it looks really useful (seen from screenshots on their website) and how do you get it to work.

Daih Thel phae 'e, clann 'e phaen
Kjetil
21
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Joined: 15th Jan 2003
Location: Norway
Posted: 19th Feb 2003 17:58
I'v never tried milkshape, but is it difficult to migrate to milkshape from a high-end 3D-package like max,maya,xsi or lighwave?

What would be the up'n downside?

Would it be posible to use milkshape as a 3'rd party package to import objects with bonestructure, keys and a readymade uv map layout with the possibility to change the mesh, bones, keys,textures and uv's?

How about triangulation and soft/hard edges, is this buildt in functions in milkshape?

- Kjetil
actarus
21
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Joined: 29th Aug 2002
Location: 32 Light Years away
Posted: 19th Feb 2003 18:16
-What would be the up'n downside?

Migrating from an high-end software to Milkshape is considerable a 'downside'.


-How about triangulation and soft/hard edges, is this buildt in functions in milkshape


lol! no...Take a look at it on [a href="http://www.milkshape3d.com"]Milkshape3d's website[/href]

Just remember that you're standing on a planet that's evolving
And revolving at nine hundred miles an hour!
Shadow Robert
21
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Joined: 22nd Sep 2002
Location: Hertfordshire, England
Posted: 19th Feb 2003 21:32
the way i texture in Milkshape is probably one of the weirdest ways you'll see ... (well until 2.0.0 with its new uvmapper but didn't hear that from me )

i save my mesh and then sit there and carefully unwrap each face until out stretched - then i flatten to the XZ plane and do a top planner map

et voila a nice UV map, which you then take the time to unweld and reweld vertex and move them into place on the map - its alot of fun ... timely but fun

Tsu'va Oni Ni Jyuuko Fiori Sei Tau!
One block follows the suit ... the whole suit of blocks is the path ... what have you found?

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